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Masters

If you’re new to the sport of Olympic weightlifting when you start training the focus will be on technique. You’ll begin by using a light bar to learn the movements for the two Olympic lifts; the snatch, and the clean and jerk. The weights you lift will increase as your skills improve. 

Regardless of your experience level you can be guaranteed to develop greater flexibility, coordination and balance as a result of your training. Two additional positive impacts that come along with doing resistance training include increased muscle mass and increased bone density. It is particularly important that we maintain these two physical attributes throughout our lifetime as they are vital to sustaining mobility as we get older. More recently it has been shown that resistance training is also important for our brain function.

In Olympic weightlifting you are eligible to compete as a Masters weightlifter from the 1st January of the year in which you turn 35. The age groups go up in 5 year increments (35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80+) and the bodyweight categories are as follows: 

Women: 45, 49, 55, 59, 64, 71, 76, 81, 87, 87+

Men: 55, 61, 67, 73, 81, 89, 96, 102, 109, 109+

You don't have to lift big weights in competitions. The minimum weight required for women is 21kg and the minimum weight required for men is 26kg. There are plenty of competitions held throughout the year hosted by local Clubs. The opportunity also exists to compete in championships at State, National and International level. 

To view the list of local competitions go to the Calendar tab. On the national stage, Darwin will be hosting the Australian Masters Championships on March 16 and 17, 2019.

Whatever your sporting background, level of fitness or health requirements Olympic weightlifting is a sport that is achievable, enjoyable and rewarding.

 
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